Will Swans become permanent fixtures on Crane Lake?

Trumpeter Swans

Trumpeter Swans

There have been at least 2 Swans hanging around the south shore of Crane Lake since before all the ice went out. They are such big, beautiful birds that people just love to see them. I believe these are Trumpeter Swans as opposed to Tundra Swans. Both Swans can be found in the this area at the right time of the year during migration. And both Swans can look pretty much the same size and can cause confusion when trying to identify which species is which.
Trumpeter Swan bill

Trumpeter Swan bill

This photo shows one of the field marks of the Trumpeter Swan and that is the V shape across the top of the bill that is formed by the black feathering between the eye and the beginning of the bill. A Tundra Swan would show a more rounded border and most Tundras have yellow lores, the lores is the area between the eye and the gape of the bill.
Big Foot

Big Foot

Swans are our largest waterfowl and they towered over the dabbler ducks that were in the area. Trumpeter Swans can weigh up to 23 lbs and their wingspan is 80″ – that’s over 6 feet. This Swan was showing off its huge webbed feet.
Last summer there was a  family of Trumpeters at Crane Lake as noted in my post from last July:
American Widgeon

American Widgeon

Some Widgeon were also on Crane Lake this morning. We don’t get to see “Baldpates” too often here at Crane.
This entry was posted in Crane Lake Area. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.