Trumpeters

Trumpeter Swans with Cygnet

Trumpeter Swans with Cygnet

The fairy tale, The Ugly Duckling, comes to mind.

Trumpeter Swan with young one

Trumpeter Swan with young one

There’s a lot of food in this pond for Trumpeter Swans. They eat emerging aquatic vegetation, hense their long necks come in handy for that type of feeding.

Trumpeters and Pied-billed Grebe

Trumpeters and Pied-billed Grebe

This pond was attracting lots of waterfowl including the juvenile Pied-billed Grebe in the lower left hand corner of this photo. The young Grebe still has the stripes on its’ face indicating that it’s a young one.

perturbed Trumpeter Swan

perturbed Trumpeter Swan

This adult Trumpeter may have been getting a little anxious with my presence.

Trumpeter Swan preening

Trumpeter Swan preening

The Trumpeter Swan family was actively feeding the entire time I was there, except for a time out for a little preening.

Trumpeter Swan family

Trumpeter Swan family

The whole Swan family, there are 3 young ones. They were born on June 8th, over 2 months ago, and they are slightly more than¬†half grown. I’ve read that it takes 90 days for the young Trumpeters to be able to fly – that’s a long time! And, the adults are flightless for a while too as they molt their primary flight feathers. It will be an exciting month as we watch the young birds grow up.

These birds are amazing as they inhabit more than one beaver pond through out the summer. The other pond where the nest was located is up by the Voyageur Statue. It’s about 3/4 mile through the woods between the two¬†beaver ponds. After the Swans have migrated I will have to take a hike through the area to see how they do it. As far as I know there is no creek linking the two ponds, they must walk.

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4 Responses to Trumpeters

  1. Amanda says:

    We have a pair of trumpeters that return to the small undeveloped lake (bordering on very large pond) across the road from us. I love them! So beautiful to see all summer long.

  2. Dennis Holme says:

    I was surprised last year to find a group of about 25 trumpeters wintering near my home in Shoreview, MN on an open water segement of the St Paul water supply channel out of Sucker Lake into Vadnais Lake. People feed them. They seem to tolerate the hundreds of mallards but they must drive off the geese, there were none. I also encounter them living within trumpet range of my little shack on the Vermilion River near Buyck.

    • Vacation says:

      That is so cool! I love your description, within trumpet range. I think I might have heard your trumpeters early this spring when I was doing a grouse survey on 24. There must be a pond or small lake back in the woods. Did they have any young ones?

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