Crazy Migration

This year’s fall migration has been crazy! The roadways have been filled with migrating birds. Many are being hit by cars. I have never seen so many Yellow-rumped Warblers. The Warblers along with Juncos and White-throated and White-crowned Sparrows make up the bulk of the numbers. But there’s another LBB (little brown bird) that moves through in the fall, the Lapland Longspur.

longspur,lapland

Lapland Longspur

Look for the comma shape on the bird’s face for a good field mark.

The name Lapland Longspur is interesting. It would suggest that these birds have something to do with Lapland. Lapland is a region located in northern Finland, it is the homeland of the indigenous Sami people. This bird does occur in Lapland, but also all across the polar arctic. They breed on the arctic tundra and then migrate south through out North America, Asia and Europe. There are 3 recognized sub-species.

The Longspur description refers to the hind toe, which is longer and aids in scratching around in the soil. In the US, there are other Longspurs: Smith’s, McGown’s, and Chestnut-collared.

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Spruce Grouse survey update

http://news.dnr.state.mn.us/2018/09/17/new-spruce-grouse-survey-gives-dnr-a-window-on-tough-to-monitor-birds/

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Ruffed Grouse forecast

https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/sports/outdoors/4496773-grouse-forecast-good-not-great?utm_source=DNT+Today+Email&utm_campaign=6948ffc1e2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_09_08_10_37&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_30a195ad60-6948ffc1e2-234069385

 

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Nashville Warbler

Nashville Warbler

The yellow breast feathers of the Nashville Warbler has been described as “Dandelion” yellow. What do you think?

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Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

The muted colors of the basic (winter) plumaged Blackburnian Warbler.

Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

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Wilson’s

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

These are adult birds in breeding plumage.

Wilson’s Warbler

This Wilson’s is either a female or a first year juvenile. The distinctive black cap has not appeared yet – or the feathers have not grown in.

Wilson’s Warbler

This might be a young one still begging for food.

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

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Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped “Myrtle” Warbler

Here is an female adult or it could be a “first winter”  ‘Myrtle’ sub-species of the Yellow-rumped Warbler. Looks a lot like the basic plumaged Cape May.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Here is an adult in full breeding plumage. This Warbler changes quite a bit in the winter.

"Myrtle" sub-species of the Yellow-rumped Warbler

“Myrtle” sub-species of the Yellow-rumped Warbler

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Warbler migration has been crazy!

Cape May

Female and juvenile Cape May Warblers can be confused with Yellow-rumped Warblers. They both have the distinctive yellow ‘rump’.

Cape May

There are tell-tale signs that this is a Cape May – there can be a yellow wash to the breast as you can kind of see in the above photo.

Cape May

This is an adult in ‘basic’ or winter plumage. You can still see the orange ear patch, although it’s faded and smaller.

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More Migrants

Northern Parula

Cape May Warbler

Yellow-rumped “Myrtle” Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Northern Parula

Cape May Warbler

 

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Fall migration has begun

Cape May Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Nashville Warbler

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