Wildflowers aplenty

Twin Flowers

Twin Flowers

Wild Rose

Wild Rose

Pitcher Plant flower

Pitcher Plant flower

Pitcher Plant flowers

Pitcher Plant flowers

Roundleaf Sundew
Roundleaf Sundew

A carniverous plant, the Roundleaf Sundew catches small insects in its sticky fronds.

Bog Cranberry flower

Bog Cranberry flower

Blue Flag Iris

Blue Flag Iris

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we’re in trouble now…

Canadian Honkers and goslings

Canadian Honkers and goslings

Canadian Geese have been showing up more and more frequently in the Crane Lake area. Only in the last few years have they begun nesting, historically we would only see Canadian Geese at Crane Lake during migration.

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mis-identified

Naked Mitrewort

Naked Mitrewort

I had identified this tiny little flower in a earlier post as Twayblade, but it’s actually Naked Mitrewort. I found out as I was looking around at different wildflower websites. Its’ common name is Bishop’s Cap or Naked Bishop’s Cap. The naked part refers to the bare flower stalk and the Bishop Cap refers to the seed pod that forms later. I don’t know if I’ll be able to find this plant again to see the seed stage. It’s such a tiny little plant that it probably gets totally hidden as the lush foliage of the forest floor fills in.

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Conifer Flowers

Tamarack cones

Tamarack cones

Tamarack Flowers

Tamarack Flowers


Tamarack trees have the most beautiful cones. They look like little purple roses.

Pine Cone Flowers

Pine Cone Flowers


Pine trees get flowers too. They don’t last very long and during this time they release lots of light yellow dusty pollen.

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Wolf’s milk

Wolfs milk

Wolf's milk


I posted this photo last week and the caption read “unknown mushrooms”, well, thanks to Kraig, these orange objects aren’t mushrooms at all. According to Wikipedia, it’s actually a slime mold!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycogala_epidendrum
Lycogala epidendrum is the scientific name and it is described as a plasmodial slime mould. Yuk!

It’s common name is Wolf’s milk. I don’t think a wolf’s milk is orange – what a strange name for a strange organism – maybe they do go together.

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More Wildflowers

unknown Mushrooms

unknown Mushrooms

Twayblade

Twayblade

Jack in the Pulpit

Jack in the Pulpit

Nodding Trillium

Nodding Trillium

Starflower

Starflower


The tiny Starflowers are blooming everywhere.
Bunchberry Flowers

Bunchberry Flowers


The flowers are actually the little buds in the center of the bracts, which are the big white petals. Several little flowers are blooming in the middle.

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Wildflower update

Cotton Grass

Cotton Grass

Not very showy, but this grass is actually a “sedge”, and is growing in abundance at a local bog.

Chokecherry flowers

Chokecherry flowers

It’s going to be another great year for Chokecherry picking.

Chokecherry flowers

Chokecherry flowers

Notice how the berries will form, just like a cluster of grapes. Can you say wine???!!!

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More Eye Candy

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

No Calories consumed…

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

…just burned

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Such a pretty bird with such a poor name. This Warbler can be found in any stand of Balsam Fir around Crane Lake.

Golden-winged Warbler

Golden-winged Warbler

Good name for this bird, the Golden wing bars are quite visible.

Golden-winged Warbler

Golden-winged Warbler

These Warblers like to hang out in young Aspen trees.

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

This Chestnut-sided was just about to fly away, but you can see the chestnut on his sides very well. It’s a good name for this little, sassy Warbler even if it is hard to say ten times in a row!  

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Wood Thrush at Crane Lake

Wood Thrush

Wood Thrush

Thanks to Chris for finding this bird on opening fishing weekend, May 14th. This Wood Thrush is a little north of its’ normal range which generally is south of here in the deciduous woods. Our area is more coniferous, or mostly evergreen pine trees. The Wood Thrush is categorized as “rare” in Voyageurs National Park according to their literature.

This bird is still hanging around and I was able to get this rather bad shot last weekend. He was really hard to get to sit still, he was flying all over the place singing his beautiful song all the while. Of all the “spot-breasted” Thrushes that occur in North America, the Wood Thrush has to have the most beautiful song. Our Hermit Thrushes also have a wonderful song that is most often heard around here. Swainson’s Thrushes also breed at Crane Lake and their song is also quite lovely. Then there’s the Veery, how can it get any prettier! You’ll just have to find out for yourself by visiting Crane Lake. I am curious, which is your favorite bird song?

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Would you go hiking here?

Deer Skull and Crossbones

Deer Skull and Crossbones

Some humorist found these in the woods and left them at the trailhead. Very spooky!

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